Wednesday, August 05, 2015

The View From Goresat


Al Gore conceived Triana as a satellite that would inspire us to see the Earth as our one world to cherish and protect, but Eli doubts that even he foresaw the latest image from NASA showing the moon crossing the Earth orb.


7 comments:

Magma said...

I can't say what Al Gore may or may not have been expecting, but I've been waiting for this. Although I didn't expect it to happen so soon after the satellite became operational.

The nearly full moon disappearing and emerging from behind the full Earth will also provide some notable images in the coming weeks or months.

Barton Paul Levenson said...

Just plain cool!

Hank Roberts said...

And there's now another (single) image available showing Africa (no Moon).
http://www.spaceflight101.com/dscovr-mission-updates.html

Hank Roberts said...

PS, anyone seen a stereo pair using a couple of those images including the Moon? Ought to be ...

Russell Seitz said...

Deos the sattellite meander fast enough within the Lagrangian garavity well to do stereo?

Hank Roberts said...

> meander
No need for the satellite to move since the planet is moving. Take two successive images (pick ones without the obscuring Moon) and make one left and the other right.

Same works for the Moon because the Moon wobbles a bit:
http://physics.kenyon.edu/EarlyApparatus/Astronomy/Moon_Stereo/Greenslade57a.JPG

---------
I thought DSCOVR was going to have more imagery up by the end of September. Well, there's a few hours left.

I also hoped, though without any encouragement, that DSCOVR would make the raw images available, as so many other publicly financed projects do -- Cyclops has the Saturn system raw imagery easily available. They also have a link for amateur imagery made from the official images -- time lapse movies made from still sequences.

Surely we could be doing that with the multispectral channel images from DSCOVR every day.

Hank Roberts said...

p.s.: "All in all, about 59% of the moon is visible from Earth over the course of a year"
http://qz.com/398306/watch-the-moon-wobble-its-way-through-all-of-2015-in-this-nasa-video/ (written May 05, 2015 and the videos seem to be broken, but the explanation of how we can see the Moon from 'two different angles' is clear enough.