Sunday, September 08, 2013

Water




Eli of course, admires Ed Darrell.  So when Ed "borrows" from Eli that is a lesson.  John Fleck dug up a stunning graphic of the LA water aqueduct from the Colorado River., and who is Eli not to take advantage.  Besides, John has not exactly been a buddy.  It's open season bunnies.

12 comments:

Rattus Norvegicus said...

Best heckling ever heard at a ballgame.

Dodgers vs. Giants, middle of the summer sometime in the mid-90s. Giants up, Dodgers pitcher wasting time, in between the usual "you suck" and "throw the damn ball" I hear someone yell out "stop stealing our water!". I laughed so hard I spilled my beer.

Ed Darrell said...

Wonderful map. You should alert Strange Maps to it.

Makes me want to know the exact story of the origins of the Salton Sea, where the breach in the thing was, where the water flowed, etc., etc.

No one else did that odd election ad better than you, you know. I find it difficult and pointless to try to improve on things where I can't, except perhaps by providing a slightly larger audience.

Russell Seitz said...

Lest we forget, the albedo footprint of the Salton Sea is on a par with that of Los Angeles- note that black roofs and roads comprise < 10 % of the citie's 13,000 km2 area .

John Mashey said...

"Whiskey is for drinking; water is for fighting over."

David B. Benson said...

Ed Darrell --- It was the All-American Canal which broke to turn the Salton Sink into the Salton Sea when almost all of the Colorado River poured through the breach for about 2 years.

Brian said...

The map shows why getting water to LA is so energy intensive. We've got it a lot easier here in the SF Bay Area.

Desal is a big energy hog, but it might do okay in comparison to some of these sources. Recycling wastewater is far better though.

Russell Seitz said...

"Desal is a big energy hog, but it might do okay in comparison to some of these sources."

Distillation doesn't come cheap-- when water gets expensive as whiskey, there's bound to be fighting.

EliRabett said...

Those old salts are rough customers.

Jeffrey Davis said...

The future, Mr. Gits. The future.

Fixed Carbon said...

Were those bubbles surfacing in Millard Fillmores bathtub?

Anonymous said...

Just for a couple of references, estimates attribute about 19 percent percent of California's electricity consumption and 32 percent of natural gas consumption to water transportation, storage, and treatment. This will of course change due to climate, population and land use shifts, but efficiency is usually cheaper/better than building new infrastructure like dams or desalination plants.

We've also got big worries in the Delta, with sea level rising, weak levees, major quakes, large populations living near or below sea level, subsidence, and potential superstorms. However, many do not agree with Jerry Brown Jr's solution of digging tunnels around the Delta, another version of the "Peripheral Canal" that was blocked by voters in 1982. Authoritarian that he is, however, JBJr has been undeterred by the inconvenient will of the voters.

Taylor B

JonnieG said...

I ran into this "7th wonder of the world" a few years ago when I went 4-wheeling down Berdoo Canyon starting from inside Joshua Tree National Park. At the mouth of the canyon are the (shot-up) foundations of old buildings, relics of a town (houses, schools, hospitals and stores) built for the miners digging these astounding miles-long tunnels. All in the 1930s! The San Jacinto tunnel goes 13-miles underneath the 10,000-ft San Jacinto Mtns! Wow!