Sunday, July 25, 2010

Reading Assignments

Eli recommends an interesting and important appreciation of Stephen Schneider by John Nielson Gammon, something to warm MT and the Pig's hearts from Dana Milbank at the Washington Post, a discussion of tenure at the NY Times, and to Eli, a more interesting take from an administrator at a community college, with Ben Hale and Brian Leiter chiming in.

Ben also provides video motivation for the coming semester. Talk about positioning, Ben Herman and Roger Pielke Sr. rip G&T a new one, but are too polite to mention names. Steve Easterbrook has carved out an important burrow in the interface between science and software. Although the discussion is about climate science, everything pretty much goes for other scientific software. And Bart, he is simply tearing up the place

6 comments:

bluegrue said...

To their credit, Herman and Pielke Sr. also tried to explain it to the WUWTers; many of the replies are bizarre.

Anonymous said...

Replies in WUWT are not bizarre, they are really incredible. The Watts of the Universe have fed the trolls so long that they can no longer control them any more. Funny. MickeyMinnieMouseJon

Lazar said...

Roy Spencer on G&T, less concise but perhaps more interesting, I think the greater length helps to drive the conceptual stuff through, also an interesting comment by Phil.

cpwinter said...

Blankenship! He bids fair to turn his name into a curse word — like Quisling.

Anonymous said...

You want bizarre and funny in the same package? Watch as Roy Spencer attempts to explain to his oh-so-fickle followers why cooler things can make warm things warmer:

http://www.drroyspencer.com/2010/07/yes-virginia-cooler-objects-can-make-warmer-objects-even-warmer-still/

Being burned as a heretic, that's how "cool things make warm things warmer."

Marion Delgado said...

I think as you reconfigure radiative/conductive/refractive greybody transfer models to account for the phlogistonic ether, you immediately produce a differential of, e.g., Steve Goddard's model with the groupthink one. I've labeled the difference "hoc" for reasons anyone with a classical education and a smattering of the relevant science should understand. It turns out the plasma sun cosmology, cosmic ray cloud anomaly and solar cycle warming match all differ by multiples of hoc, which is approximately what is needed for appropriately chosen units of measure. Simply adding hoc balances the equations, making the conventional explanation a discarded subset of the breakthrough theory.