Sunday, February 25, 2007

A new feature

If you look to the left, below the section with Eli's distinguished bio, you will find a new section, Textbooks, with only two entries, the Stratospheric Ozone on line textbook and on line parts of David Archer's text on Global Climate: Understanding the Forecast. For a long time the web has relied on hit or miss structures such as FAQs (see Bob Grumbine's collection for the best in climate science), and organized posts (see Coby Beck's How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic series), but as the medium matures there is an increasing need for more formal texts which can be used in a classroom, or by interested anonymice for teaching. While the on line content for Archer's book is not complete, it does include two complete (and important) chapters and climate science applets which allow the interested to play what if.

Rabett Publishing is interested in linking to other appropriate textbooks.

7 comments:

Adam said...

Does Spencer Weart's book count?

http://www.aip.org/history/climate/index.html

EliRabett said...

Of course, how could I have forgotten

thanks

Andrew Dessler said...

I have written books on both stratospheric ozone (here) and climate change (here). The ozone book is mainly targeted as a graduate-level textbook, while the climate book is aimed at interested, non-experts (e.g., someone who reads NYT Science Times).

Anonymous said...

Thin Ice by Mark Bowen is a fine account of the work of Lonnie Thompson and his collaborators.

EliRabett said...

Hi Andrew, Rabett Publishing was first going to link to on line texts, but we should, as you point out, also point to the wood chip lot, probably separated by target audience. Tomorrow is a good time to start.

Anonymous said...

A fine idea. The link to Weart's book on RealClimate has been a great comfort when I have been made very cross by sashka. More electronic references--good for the Wabett!

Anonymous said...

Good luck, Andrew.

You have undertaken the near impossible.

Anyone who reads the NYT science section needs real help -- straightening out all the misconceptions that people like Gregg Easterbrook have introduced about global warming.