Thursday, July 26, 2018

Public Access Policies for NASA

At least for the physical sciences public access policies are fairly recent and not at all clear.  This became obvious to Eli in a recent Twitter exchange and indeed, shows that many have not read the FAQ.

Note, that these are public access policies, not an open access policy, the difference being that any material not labelled open access remains under copyright but can be read.  It is subject to normal copyright use.  Open access publications are usually covered by Creative Commons copyrights.

NASA has established an archive for public access, NASA PubSpace, as part of PubMed Central.  Policy requires that digital copies of all peer reviewed articles sponsored by NASA in full or in part be made available for public access on PubSpace for publications supported by NASA grants that started after November 28, 2016 (OTOH there is another place which says it applies to all funded proposals submitted after January 2016.  Consult your program officer).  Unlike some other US government publication archives the final version must be deposited although an embargo of 12 months is allowed. IF the journal has an agreement with PubMed Central this may occur automatically.  Talk to your publisher.
What repository does NASA require PIs to use for depositing publications?  
NASA requires principal investigators who publish peer-reviewed journal articles or juried conference papers to deposit a copy of the item (either the final accepted version or the version of record, as defined in NASA's public access plan) in the NASA public access repository hosted by the National Institutes of Health at PubMed Central. 
What is a "final accepted version" of a manuscript?  
The final accepted version is the author's final manuscript of a peer-reviewed paper accepted for journal publication, including all modifications resulting from the peer-review process. It is the version before the journal makes edits that will constitute the final "version of record."  
What is a "version of record"?  
The version of record is the publisher's authoritative copy of the paper, including all modifications from the publishing peer review process, copyediting, stylistic edits, and formatting changes.
In other words no preprints.  Whose gonna pay for it?
What if my grant does not have sufficient funds to cover publication costs (remember this means costs with the public access in 12 months or less), or the grant has expired?  
Please consult with your institutional official for advice and options.
:)

Where is the hammer?
Will compliance with the NASA Public Access Policy affect the outcome of the application review? 
Compliance with the NASA Public Access Policy is not a factor in the scientific and technical merit evaluation of grant applications. Non-compliance will be addressed administratively and may delay or prevent awarding of funds. 
Are there exceptions?
Will NASA grant exceptions to the policy?  
NASA will consider exceptions only under the most extreme circumstances, such as the death of the sole author, on a case-by-case basis.
They have a video for external grantees, for civil service folk  and a FAQ

For civil service types there is undoubtedly training.  For external grantees, the first step is to register with Orcid.  With your grant you should have received information about linking your NASA grant to Orcid.  If not contact nasa-openaccess@mail.nasa.gov.  This is mandatory for PIs but co-Is and authors should also do this.  Registering links your grant to the National Institutes of Health Manuscript Submission System.  You should also check in your grant/contract whether your project requires pre-publication review.  In case of doubt check with your grant monitor.

At this point you have to go to the NIH Manuscript Submission System and it gets complicated.  Briefly, you login using your NASA Orcid ID, fill in some metadata, identify a Reviewer (PI appears simplest), upload the manuscript files including supplementary data


The FAQ and the Video have more information.  Eli's candid advice at this point is to take somebunny with an R1 out to lunch and get their advice on PubMed Central and the NIH Manuscript Submission System.

3 comments:

Old_salt said...

Obviously I am too old for this--posted a comment yesterday but probably failed to hit the right button.

Two points--1. publishing/archiving scientific literature costs money, and 2. insufficient money is currently available either from grants or universities in order to publish open source and allow public access for no added cost.

Perhaps we should follow the EU not only on health care but on a commitment toward open source publication. The submit-a-draft system is a bandaid that puts all the responsibility back on the PI without giving them added resources to accomplish the task.

EliRabett said...


Exactly the point.

The key is, as you point out, supporting the publishers. Which can either be directly or through page charges of some sort. If the funding agencies want open source or public access, they either need to take over publishing themselves, fund the publishing directly which is sort of what the EU is doing or put enough money into grants to pay the page charges.

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